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Lifestyle

What does it really mean to be 'liked'?

By JordanBrowzer 14 May 2018

Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, Facebook, Whatsapp... The social platforms available to us are endless!


The obsession and desire for an online presence can have a bigger impact on your confidence and self-esteem than you realise and comes at a cost...

A serious case of FOMO

The fear of missing out is what keeps us constantly checking our phones! It makes us feel better to be included in our friends' photos and conversations because if we miss out, this will trigger anxious and depressed feelings. According to specialists, this can be the start of serious mental health issues.

The glamour

No matter who you are and what you're doing, someone on social media will be having an even better time! That's why it is important to try and block it out. Getting worked up by this pressure is another thing that can encourage anxiety. All their partying might look amazing but excessive partying (with smoking/alcohol) can affect your mental health.

The selfie effect

Some psychologists think that selfies are just for getting attention and being part of the culture. This means if we post selfies and don't get the responses we wanted, we don't feel accepted. People may then edit their pictures to look a way they think will be more 'liked'. This is why it's a good idea to put your phone down from time to time and not let it get to you.

Compare and despair

Sometimes you'll log onto social media apps for a bit of a nosey and that's fine, but it's important to spend less time checking what other people are doing and focus on YOUR goals! It'll make you a lot happier, less disappointed and less envious of others. All of these (unsurprisingly) have a negative effect on your mental health. 

Social media is great for pictures, making events and catching up, but when you're checking your phone every 5 minutes instead of actually talking to people or starting to depend on it - it becomes a problem.

Struggling with mental health issues? Check out Mind and Samaritans for support and advice. Don't forget you can also speak to Student Support Services at SHU about how you're feeling.

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